The Student News Site of Sonoma State University

Sonoma State Star

The Student News Site of Sonoma State University

Sonoma State Star

The Student News Site of Sonoma State University

Sonoma State Star

Mental health check-in: How are you?

Mental+health+check-in%3A+How+are+you%3F
Jena Hollister

Seasonal depression can hit college students hard. Now that the sun is starting to peek out of the clouds and students are settling into new semester routines, how are seawolves doing with managing a healthy mental state? 

Many students, like Madison Diaz, a first-year criminology major, are feeling good so far now that the confusion and anxieties of new classes are over and a routine is forming. Diaz said she feels all right about her classes. When talking about possible reasons for bad mental health, Diaz notes, “I personally don’t like to go out… but for some people who like going out and exploring, it could be difficult” because Rohnert Park doesn’t have much to do or have many establishments that stay open later at night. When asked if having more counselors on campus would benefit students in crisis, Diaz said, “I think it would for a lot of other students who need extra help. It would be beneficial to have.” Diaz also agreed that having the sun start to come out a little more will help many students feel better overall. Even though Diaz prefers the winter, she still sees the correlation between the sun shining and having a better mood and mindset. 

Syed Shahriar Sadman, a second-year business grad student, said he felt “overwhelmed at the beginning because there were so many assignments. But it’s all good now. I’m settled.” Although Sadman said he is still struggling due to a decline in his family’s health, dealing with that on top of school is hard, but he still radiates excellent positive energy. Sadman also noted that there are not many activities to keep students busy and help their mental health if they feel down. “If there were more physical sports to do like soccer or basketball, if people are interested in it, it can help them mentally, to be honest. Also physically, too,” Sadman said, explaining that when you feel good physically, you will feel good mentally.  Sadman also added that he doesn’t know much about the counselors on campus or the need for more but said no matter what, having more counselors is always good. 

Sonoma Students can feel down occasionally throughout the semester due to the lack of college life in Rohnert Park. “They just want something to do, and it can dampen spirits,” Owen Streyle, a fourth-year studio art major, said when talking about how living in a small city can slightly hurt your mental health. Overall, Streyle is feeling “pretty good” this semester. With occasional sunny days, Streyle said that students seem ready for the warmth and sun to be here to lift gloomy spirits. “I think some people like the rain, but at some point, enough is enough, and we’re ready for it to be sunny and warm again.” Streyle finished off by saying, “I think having mental health issues myself, it’s good to be able to find things that help you out and get you through day to day.” According to The Journalist’s Resources, something that helps many college students battling mental health problems is types of meditation to relieve forms of anxiety, depression, and stress.

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About the Contributor
Jena Hollister, Staff Writer
Jena Hollister is a third year communication major at Sonoma State.
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